Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Easy Prey by Catherine Lo: The Internet is A Nasty Place


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Blurb:
Only three students had access to a teacher’s racy photos before they went viral. There’s Mouse, a brainy overachiever so desperate to escape his father and go to MIT that he would do almost anything, legal or not. Then there’s Drew, the star athlete who can get any girl’s number—and private photos—with his charm but has a history of passing those photos around. And finally there’s Jenna, a good girl turned rebel after her own shocking photos made the rounds at school last year, who is still waiting for justice. All three deny leaking the photos, but someone has to take the fall. This edgy whodunit tackles hot-button issues of sexting and gossip and will have readers tearing through the pages to reach the final reveal.

Review:
Three out of Five Stars
Easy prey’s story is directly relevant to its title. It tells the story of how when you prey on others, completely disregard the people you hurt, you just might become easy prey yourself. 

The internet can be a nasty place. I think many of us have experienced its nastiness in some way shape or form. Easy prey shows this in seemingly real time.

Jenna, Mouse, and Drew are paired off in law class. As a group, they must tackle the effects of the internet by reviewing a case in which a girl’s photos are posted online, and the guy gets no punishment. See, Jenna has been before and would prefer not to go there again.

This time, however, she plans to be on the right side of it, and to prove once and for all, that the girl suffering is the victim and deserves justice, even if it means she must get it by unconventional means.

What worked for this story is the fact that it comes off as very real. Most of us or have heard of someone who’s been cyber bullied-whether it is by words, or having risqué photos posted of you online. At least one or two celebrities in this lifetime have had this happen.

While the book does a good job of tackling this, by the end of it, the reader dependent upon the interpretation, could be left with a bad taste in their mouth. 

The end of the story contradicts its overall message. If its intention was shock value it did that, but in order to accomplish what was intended it caused the same harm, it fought so hard to struggle against throughout the book.

That was a hard pill to swallow, realistic, but hard. 

Overall, it’s a decent read that does more good than harm, but a more fair ending would’ve been preferred.

2 comments:

  1. While this definitely sounds timely and relevant, your comments about the ending have me less than excited for it. Like the ending almost negates the rest. Lame.

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